St Charles Siding Repair
 Call us: 630-687-9613
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Downspout Repair St Charles IL
Introduction
Q: I got rid of the rusty old gutters on my 1830s farmhouse. Now I need new ones. What should I replace them with?
 


 I'd recommend that you install traditional half-round gutters in copper. The style is appropriate to your house, and you'll never have to worry about the copper rusting.

Hanging them is not hard, as long as you have a helper to lift and set the sections in place. But first you need to size up your situation so that you can order the parts. Ask yourself: What lengths do I need? Will each gutter get one downspout or two? And what about the fascia, where the gutters attach? Is it angled or plumb? Is it even sound? (If it isn't, repair it.)

When the parts arrive, locate the high point of the gutter's run—the farthest point from a single downspout or the midpoint between two. Then you can set the pitch, and the rest is all downhill.

Shown: fits a downspout elbow to a copper gutter. Its shine will fade, but this durable metal will last a lifetime.Being a family-owned and operated business, we’re able to offer you that personal touch you’ve been looking for. Our goal is to make all of our customers happy. 

At St Charles Siding Repair, we really care about the products we sell, and we’d like to share our most important services and products with you. 

(SIDING REPAIR-GUTTER REPAIR-ROOF REPAIR-SOFFIT REPAIR - GUTTER CLEANING - DOWNSPOUT REPAIR.) 

We look forward to hearing from you soon!
 Call us: 630-687-9613
Soffit Repair St Charles IL
Dig the trench deep enough to drain downhill from the side of the dry well. You’ll also need at least 3 in. of crushed rock to add to the bottom of the trench to promote water absorption. Assuming your lot isn’t shaped like a large salad bowl with the house at the bottom center, look for a spot that’s lower than the house to drain the excess water. If one of those spots is right next to your neighbor’s garage, resist the temptation. If the lay of the land isn’t obvious, use a line level with stakes and a tape measure to check for water escape routes. Remember, you might not be able to use all the techniques we show, so pick those that best meet your needs.

Some Soils are Tough to Dig
The soil we dug up for our 70-ft. long trench and dry well was among the worst (next to solid rock) for digging. The mostly clay soil (a poor-draining type) was full of 4- to 8-in. fieldstone—a far cry from the ideal sand soil. The digging took me and a helper two solid days of backbreaking labor. With any luck, yours will be a lot easier to dig, but be prepared. Get a large chisel-point bar (Photo 1) to pry stones out of the way just to make room for each shovelful.

Buy Everything You Need for This Job at a Home Center
The dry well we used has a capacity of nearly 30 gallons. This unit can also be stacked on top of or alongside another if you need extra holding capacity. The dry well is very strong, and once you bury it, you can drive your car over it without breaking it. In fact, the dry well can be installed under a driveway. The drain inlet at the top (Photos 5 and 8) is optional.

You can also choose to: (1) drain water directly into the side port of the unit from a run of perforated or unperforated drain tubing, (2) link two or more dry well units together, or (3) use it independently with a top drain for small pooling areas. You can purchase snap-together tube in 10-ft. lengths as we did or buy a 50-ft. roll, which is difficult to transport. You’ll find the tube is available in either perforated (1/2-in. holes randomly cut into the sides) or unperforated.

Choose a perforated tube if you’d like it to drain as it carries water. However, if you only want the tube to deliver water from one spot to another, buy unperforated tubing and don’t use a sock. The sock (Photo 7) is typically sold in 100-ft. lengths. You can also buy a wide assortment of fittings to connect lines, as well as a fitting to attach to your downspout. The materials for this system cost about $200. We spent another $200 for 2 cu. yds. of crushed rock delivered to our driveway.

Before going to the home center, make sure you’ve got a good shovel, a string line and level, and a solid wheelbarrow. If you don’t, buy them.